TRUFFLEPEDIA

HOW MUCH FRESH TRUFFLE DO I USE IN A SERVING?

HOW MUCH FRESH TRUFFLE DO I USE IN A SERVING?

Our Fresh Yield Guide is a great tool to refer to when deciding how much truffle to use on a dish. You’ll see that even very little - 3 grams - is enough to make an impact. There are 28 grams in an ounce of truffles, so at 3 grams, you’re getting about 9 servings. We typically would recommend 3 grams be on an appetizer sized portion.  That being said, you can add as much as you’d like. Below are general recommendations: Appetizer: 3 grams Main: 5 or 7 grams.We’d recommend that 5 grams is a ‘healthy’ portion on a...

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SHAVING VS. GRATING FRESH TRUFFLES

SHAVING VS. GRATING FRESH TRUFFLES

There are many great ways to showcase truffles in a dish. The two most popular ways are shaving or grating. Shaving truffles onto a dish offers a classic aesthetic appeal, while grating fresh truffles onto a dish offers a more aromatic and flavorful approach.  Shaving truffles on a dish allows for the truffles' beauty to shine through.The shape and marbling of a truffle is certainly something to be marveled. The shavings should always be on the thinner side to allow for the best mouthfeel. However with shaving truffles, you are limited with the amount of bites of fresh truffles in...

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TRUFFLE LEGEND FROM PERIGORD REGION

TRUFFLE LEGEND FROM PERIGORD REGION

Story adapted from Taming the Truffle by Alessandra Zambonelli, Gordon Thomas Brown, and Ian Robert Hall. There is a legend that is told in the Perigord region about an old woman, tired and hungry, losing her way in the woods. At last she stumbles upon an old house, the home of a man equally poor and old. He invites her in and offers her his meager meal of charred potatoes, cooked in the coals of a dying fire. The old woman is deeply touched by his generosity and sits down to peel the potatoes. Suddenly she is transformed into a...

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PIGS: THE OG TRUFFLE HUNTER

PIGS: THE OG TRUFFLE HUNTER

Pigs were the original truffle hunter, however, dogs have largely replaced pigs in the truffle hunting world.  Pigs are attracted to the pheromones that truffles release, due to the similar compounds that mirror testosterone found in pigs (which is why we think of it as an aphrodisiac), and would therefore, naturally hunt for them. However, due to the extreme excitement of the pig, and their erratic digging method, they end up destroying the environment and eating those precious truffles.  Due to the environmental impact, pigs have been banned in Italy for truffle hunting since 1985. Dogs have been introduced, because...

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